What can zebrafish teach us about our survival in the face of mutations?
AFTER “FREEZING” IN FEAR, WHAT PART OF THE BRAIN HELPS MAKE FISH SWIM AGAIN?
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‘Ghost Fibers’ Left Behind by Injured Muscle Cells Guide Stem Cells Into Position for Regeneration
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INTESTINAL CELLS “REMODEL” IN RESPONSE TO A FATTY MEAL
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New work led by Carnegie’s Steven Farber, with help from Yixian Zheng’s lab, sheds light on how form follows function for intestinal cells responding to high-fat foods that are rich in cholesterol and triglycerides.

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Carnegie's Department of Embryology has become recognized worldwide as one of the premier research centers in cellular, developmental and genetic biology. The department has a unique atmosphere and research style that have allowed a small enterprise to have a disproportionately large impact on science. We revere this atmosphere as the source of our inspiration and strive to further improve it as the department evolves within the current milieu of intensive activity, investment and opportunity in the biological sciences.

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Latest articles and news

Organizing a cell’s genetic material from the sidelines

Baltimore, MD—A tremendous amount of genetic material must be packed into the nucleus of every cell—a tiny compartment. One of the biggest challenges in biology is to understand how certain regions of this highly packaged DNA can be called upon, so that the genes encoded in...
Carnegie’s Allan Spradling Awarded the 23rd March of Dimes and Richard B. Johnson, Jr., MD Prize in Developmental Biology

Baltimore, MD—Allan C. Spradling, Director Emeritus of Carnegie’s Department of Embryology, has been awarded the 23rd March of Dimes and Richard B. Johnson, Jr., MD Prize in Developmental Biology as “an outstanding scientist who has profoundly advanced the science that...