Baltimore, MD–The last step of the cell cycle is the brief but spectacularly dynamic and complicated mitosis phase, which leads to the duplication of one mother cell into two daughter cells. In mitosis, the chromosomes condense and the nucleus breaks down. Fibrous structures called spindles form, which then move the chromosomal material toward opposite ends of a cell and help partition other cell contents. If something goes wrong,...
Baltimore, MD–Biochemist, developmental biologist, and physician, Donald D. Brown of Carnegie’s Department of Embryology, will receive the 2009 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for Developmental Biology. The award is given to “a senior developmental biologist in recognition of her/his outstanding and sustained contributions in the field…[and]for the individual's excellence in research and for being a superb mentor who has helped train...
Balitmore, MD—Douglas E. Koshland, staff scientist at Carnegie’s Department of Embryology, has been elected one of 72 Fellows by the American Academy of Microbiology. Fellows are annually elected “through a highly selective, peer-review process, based on their records of scientific achievement and original contributions that have advanced microbiology.” Using the simple, single-celled yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Koshland has become a leader...
Baltimore, MD—Stem cells are the body’s primal cells, retaining the youthful ability to develop into more specialized types of cells over many cycles of cell division. How do they do it? Scientists at the Carnegie Institution have identified a gene, named scrawny, that appears to be a key factor in keeping a variety of stem cells in their undifferentiated state. Understanding how stem cells maintain their potency has implications...
Washington D.C.—Christopher B. Field, director of Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology, and Douglas E. Koshland, staff scientist at the Department of Embryology, have been elected AAAS Fellows by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The announcement appears in the News & Notes section of the December19, 2008 issue of Science.   The two researchers are among 486 members who have been awarded this honor for...
Baltimore, MD—Scientists have known for decades that certain genes (called transposons) can jump around the genome in an individual cell. This activity can be dangerous, however, especially when it arises in cells that produce eggs and sperm. Such changes can threaten the offspring and the success of a species. To ensure the integrity of these cells, nature developed a mechanism to quash this genetic scrambling, but how it works has...
Allan C. Spradling, director of the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Embryology, has been awarded the 2008 Genetics Prize by the Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation in recognition of his contributions to fruit fly genomics and for “fundamental discoveries about the earliest stages of reproduction.” The prize, which consists of a gold medal and $500,000, will be presented to Spradling at the International Congress of Genetics in Berlin on...
Carnegie cell biologist Joseph G. Gall in the Department of Embryology was chosen to receive the 2007 Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize, awarded annually by Columbia University to recognize outstanding contributions to basic research in the fields of biology and biochemistry. Gall shares the 2007 award with Elizabeth H. Blackburn of the University of California, San Francisco and Carol W. Greider, of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine....
Former Embryology scientist Nina Fedoroff has won the National Medal of Science and has been named science advisor to Condoleezza Rice.
Carnegie Contact: Dr. Allan Spradling, (410) 246-3021 or spradling@ciwemb.edu For a copy of the paper, please contact: AAAS Office of Public Programs; (202) 326-6440 or scipak@aaas.org Baltimore, MD – From roundworm to human, most cells in an animal’s body ultimately come from stem cells. When one of these versatile, unspecialized cells divides, the resulting “daughter” cell receives instructions to differentiate into a specific cell type. In...
The Baltimore Sun profiles high-risk research at Carnegie Institution's Department of Embryology where "Top scientists get freedom to work."
  Washington, D.C. — Andrew Z. Fire, a scientist who discovered RNAi, or RNA interference while at the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Embryology, along with Craig C. Mello of the University of Massachusetts Medical School, was awarded a Nobel Prize for the discovery today. The Fire-Mello discovery that double-stranded RNA can quash the activity of specific genes is an important breakthrough in modern molecular biology. RNAi is now...
Baltimore, MD—The Lasker Foundation awarded Carnegie’s Joseph G. Gall the prestigious 2006 Lasker Award for Special Achievement in Medical Science. The citation recognizes that Gall is “a founder of modern cell biology who has made seminal contributions to the field of chromosome structure and function, who invented in situ hybridization, and who has been a long-standing champion of women in science.” Gall has been staff scientist at the...
Washington, DC – The Carnegie Institution of Washington and the University of Massachusetts Medical School announced today that opposition in Australia to the grant of the institutions’ patent application related to the discovery of RNAi has been withdrawn. The opposition was originally filed by Benitec, an Australian biotechnogy company, in November 2004. Announcement of the withdrawal will be published in Australia’s Official Journal of...
Baltimore, MD – We are all familiar with the dangers of too much fat in our diet—increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, and obesity are just a few of the most severe consequences. But some rare metabolic diseases, such as hypolipidemia and Tangier disease, seem to work in reverse—they severely limit the amount of fat and cholesterol that makes it into the bloodstream. Researchers from the Carnegie Institution, the University of Pennsylvania...
Contact : Dr. Benjamin Ohlstein, 410-246-3003, or 3403, email, ohlstein@ciwemb.edu; or Dr. Allan Spradling at 410-246-3021, or 3015, email spradling@ciwemb.edu For Image see http://www.carnegieinstitution.org/fruitfly/   Baltimore, MD – The six-legged fruitfly appears to have little in common with humans, but a new finding shows that they are really just tiny, distant cousins. Scientists at the Carnegie...
Contact Tina McDowell at 202-939-1120, or tmcdowell@ciw.edu or Matthew Wright at 202-939-1142, mwright@ciw.edu Image at http://www.carnegieinstitution.org/singerbuilding/   After dinner talk delivered by Maxine Singer   Baltimore, MD – Carnegie Institution trustees will dedicate a new, $31.2-million research laboratory on the Johns Hopkins University campus on Thursday, December 1, 2005, at 6:30 PM. The...
Contact Tina McDowell@ 202-939-1120, or tmcdowell@ciw.edu   Carnegie molecular biologist Joseph Gall discusses the work of groundbreaking microscopists, biologists, zoologists, and geneticists with Bill Nye, "The Science Guy," as The Science Channel counts down the greatest science discoveries of our time. In a series of segments filmed at the Embryology Department of the Carnegie...